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Sunshine and Feeling Good

By October 25, 2022No Comments

Good day sunshine
Good day sunshine
Good day sunshine

I need to laugh, and when the sun is out
I’ve got something I can laugh about
I feel good, in a special way
I’m in love and it’s a sunny day.

Beatles

And then there is John Denver’s

Sunshine on my shoulders makes me happy
Sunshine in my eyes can make me cry
Sunshine on the water looks so lovely
Sunshine almost always makes me high

 

How Do These Happy Tunes About Sunshine Fit in Here?

Vitamin D production is one of the most well-known health benefits activated by exposure to sunlight. For our skeletal, cardiovascular, neurological, and immune systems, maintaining proper vitamin D levels protects against disease, optimizes physical performance, and improves mental health.

What does sunshine have to do with it?

The human body produces vitamin D as a response to sun exposure.  Vitamin D is essential for maintaining healthy bones and teeth. It also plays many other important roles in the body, including regulating inflammation and immune function. Despite its name, vitamin D is not a vitamin but a hormone or prohormone.

Healthy bones

It helps maintain adequate blood levels of calcium and phosphorus, which is necessary for healthy bone mineralization. Vitamin D deficiency in children can cause rickets, leading to a bowlegged appearance due to the softening of the bones. Similarly, in adults, vitamin D deficiency manifests as osteomalacia or a softening of the bones. Osteomalacia results in poor bone density and muscular weakness. Long-term vitamin D deficiency can also present as osteoporosis. We talked about osteoporosis at length in an earlier article – Remember the hunchback of Notre Dame, a bad case of it.  That boy needed to get out in the sun more.

 

Immune function

An adequate intake of vitamin D may support good immune function and reduce the risk of autoimmune diseases. Vitamin D plays an important role in immune function. They believe there may be a link between long-term vitamin D deficiency and the development of autoimmune conditions, such as diabetes, asthma, and rheumatoid arthritis.

 

Symptoms

The majority of people with a vitamin D deficiency do not present with symptoms. However, a chronic deficiency may cause hypocalcemia, a calcium deficiency disease, and hyperparathyroidism, where the parathyroid glands create a hormone imbalance that raises the blood calcium levels. These conditions can lead to secondary symptoms including bone fragility, especially in older adults, osteoporosis, bone pain, fatigue, muscle twitching, weakness and muscle pain, and joint stiffness. Long-time deficiency may cause heart problems, infections, autoimmune problems, and even cancer of the breast, prostate, and colon.

Sources of vitamin D

People can often get the majority of their vitamin D intake from sunlight exposure. However, people at risk of developing vitamin D deficiency, and many other people, cannot solely rely on sunlight exposure for vitamin D production. During the winter months, when the sun is not as strong, everyone can benefit from vitamin D supplements. Vitamin D production is one of the most well-known health benefits activated by exposure to sunlight. For our skeletal, cardiovascular, neurological, and immune systems, maintaining proper vitamin D levels protects against disease, optimizes physical performance, and improves mental health.

For most white people, a half-hour in the summer sun in a bathing suit can initiate the release of 50,000 IU (1.25 mg) vitamin D into the circulation within 24 hours of exposure; this same amount of exposure yields 20,000–30,000 IU in tanned individuals and 8,000–10,000 IU in dark-skinned people.

Food Sources

  • egg yolks
  • fatty fish, such as salmon, mackerel, and tuna
  • cheese
  • beef liver
  • mushrooms
  • fortified milk
  • fortified cereals and juices

 

Supplements: Advice for adults and children over 4 years old

Move to Florida, the Sunshine State!

During the autumn and winter, you need to get vitamin D from your diet because the sun is not strong enough for the body to make vitamin D. But since it’s difficult for people to get enough vitamin D from food alone, everyone (including pregnant and breastfeeding women) should consider taking a daily supplement containing 10 micrograms of vitamin D during the autumn and winter.

Between late March/early April to the end of September, most people can get all the vitamin D they need through sunlight on their skin and from a balanced diet. You may choose not to take a vitamin D supplement during these months.

Did You Ever Consider Having Your Own Private Label?

Would it be cool to have your own private label product you could sell online or otherwise? You see others, including your friends, racking up online sales of their very own product under their own unique label and wonder if you could do it?  Fill out the brief form below to learn all you need to know.  You may be surprised. Have a great day!

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